From the APS Journal Archive: “Pathological Video-Game Use Among Youth Ages 8 to 18: A National Study”

“Pathological Video-Game Use Among Youth Ages 8 to 18: A National Study” by Douglas Gentile1 was published in Psychological Science in May 2009 and has been cited 54 times (via Web of Science) since publication.

Click here to read the article in full.

Abstract:

Researchers have studied whether some youth are “addicted” to video games, but previous studies have been based on regional convenience samples. Using a national sample, this study gathered information about video-gaming habits and parental involvement in gaming, to determine the percentage of youth who meet clinical-style criteria for pathological gaming. A Harris poll surveyed a randomly selected sample of 1,178 American youth ages 8 to 18. About 8% of video-game players in this sample exhibited pathological patterns of play. Several indicators documented convergent and divergent validity of the results: Pathological gamers spent twice as much time playing as nonpathological gamers and received poorer grades in school; pathological gaming also showed comorbidity with attention problems. Pathological status significantly predicted poorer school performance even after controlling for sex, age, and weekly amount of video-game play. These results confirm that pathological gaming can be measured reliably, that the construct demonstrates validity, and that it is not simply isomorphic with a high amount of play.

1Iowa State University and National Institute on Media and the Family, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Advertisements

0 Responses to “<em>From the APS Journal Archive</em>: “Pathological Video-Game Use Among Youth Ages 8 to 18: A National Study””



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s





Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 8 other followers

APS tweets

Twitter Updates


%d bloggers like this: